Leroy Henry, Shepton Mallet and the curious case of George Edward Smith.


A few days ago Channel 5 screened another episode of Hidden History of Britain. Presented by former politician Michael Portillo, the episode covered Shepton Mallet Prison and the case of Leroy Henry. Shepton Mallet should be familiar to readers of Crimescribe, as should Leroy Henry who I've previously covered. You can watch it here. I … Continue reading Leroy Henry, Shepton Mallet and the curious case of George Edward Smith.

On This Day in 1934; The last British hanging witnessed by a journalist.


When Frederick Parker and Albert Probert mounted the gallows at Wandsworth Prison, they died never knowing they'd taken a singular place in Britain's chronicles of crime. Theirs would be last execution in British prison to be witnessed by a gentleman (or lady) of the press. Until the Capital Punishment (Amendment) Act of 1868 executions were … Continue reading On This Day in 1934; The last British hanging witnessed by a journalist.

On This Day in 1949; Germaine Leloy-Godefroy, last French woman to face the guillotine.


She was the last woman in France to face the dreaded 'Timbers of Justice.'

IDENTIFIED: ‘An unidentified man is strapped into Sing Sing’s electric chair.’


For my 100th post, I'm going to offer you something special, something a little different from the usual fare. The story of this 'unidentified man' at the moment of his death. True crime buffs and historians will have seen this particular image many, many times. Taken by photographer William van der Weyde, it's invariably captioned … Continue reading IDENTIFIED: ‘An unidentified man is strapped into Sing Sing’s electric chair.’

Executed executioners; the biters bit.


Executioners are seen as a strange breed. Usually tolerated, sometimes celebrated, frequently feared and often despised, the man (for it usually is) who drops the blade, swings the axe, pushes the lever or throws the switch remains a breed apart. With their particular profession in mind, you might think that, death being touted as a … Continue reading Executed executioners; the biters bit.

On This Day in 1959; Elmer Brunner, the last execution in West Virginia.


  West Virginia has never been known as a hard-line death penalty State, abolishing capital punishment in 1965. After 1899 there were 104 hangings and, with a change in method, nine electrocutions. Elmer Brunner's, on April 3, 1959 was the last. Brunner wasn't a notable murderer in himself. His crime, murdering homeowner  Ruby Miller, was … Continue reading On This Day in 1959; Elmer Brunner, the last execution in West Virginia.

George Kelly, falsely convicted and quickly hanged.


  For most crime buffs the name 'George Kelly' inspires memories of rattling Tommy guns, bank robberies and the kidnapping of Charles Urschel, all attributed to American crook George 'Machine Gun' Kelly. Kelly, a second-rate gangster at best, was made out to be far worse than he actually was, spending the remainder of his life … Continue reading George Kelly, falsely convicted and quickly hanged.

Sparky’s Revenge; South Carolina considers reinstating the electric chair.


So, the State of South Carolina (previously responsible for executing then exonerating 14-year old George Stinney)   is considering dusting off Old Sparky. Difficulties in obtaining lethal injection drugs have caused a backlog on Death Row. South Carolina has numerous condemned inmates, wants to start executing them, but can't obtain the legally-approved means to do it. … Continue reading Sparky’s Revenge; South Carolina considers reinstating the electric chair.

I wrote a book.


  It's been quite some time since I last posted ere, but I have been extremely busy with paid work and earning a living. Part of that has been writing my first book. Criminal Curiosities is a collection of crooks, all with something about their crime, trial or punishment that is singular to them. The … Continue reading I wrote a book.

The Etymology Of Crime – Tyburn.


It's been a while since I last posted due to work and other commitments, so I'll be offering a series of shorter posts dedicated to the etyomology of crime in general, interspersed with the occasional longer post about other things. It's always been curious to me how many words and phrases have crept into common … Continue reading The Etymology Of Crime – Tyburn.