On This Day in 1952, Edward Kelly and Wallace Ford, Jr.


1952 was a quiet year for the Sing Sing death house. Only three prisoners walked their last mile, Edward Kelly and Wallace Ford, Jr on October 30 and before them Bernard Stein on March 6. That was pretty quiet considering 1951 saw eight inmates die including Lonely Hearts Killers Raymond Fernandez and Martha Beck on … Continue reading On This Day in 1952, Edward Kelly and Wallace Ford, Jr.

Advertisements

Justice; Regular or Extra Crispy.


Execution has long been part of criminal history, society’s ultimate sanction for the very worst offenders. Less enthusiastic supporters regard it as a necessary evil and a deterrent even while acknowledging its distasteful nature. Opponents believe it no deterrent at all, that it’s applied arbitrarily and makes society as uncivilized and barbarous as the condemned … Continue reading Justice; Regular or Extra Crispy.

On This Day in 1963: New York State’s Last Execution, Eddie Lee Mays.


August 15, 1963 was an historic day in New York's penal history, although nobody involved knew it at the time. New York's lawmakers didn't know it. the Warden of New York's infamous Sing Sing Prison (now the Ossining Correctional Facility) didn't know. Dow Hover, New York's last 'State Electrician', didn't know it. Eddie Lee Mays … Continue reading On This Day in 1963: New York State’s Last Execution, Eddie Lee Mays.

IDENTIFIED: ‘An unidentified man is strapped into Sing Sing’s electric chair.’


For my 100th post, I'm going to offer you something special, something a little different from the usual fare. The story of this 'unidentified man' at the moment of his death. True crime buffs and historians will have seen this particular image many, many times. Taken by photographer William van der Weyde, it's invariably captioned … Continue reading IDENTIFIED: ‘An unidentified man is strapped into Sing Sing’s electric chair.’

The Etymology Of Crime – Tyburn.


It's been a while since I last posted due to work and other commitments, so I'll be offering a series of shorter posts dedicated to the etyomology of crime in general, interspersed with the occasional longer post about other things. It's always been curious to me how many words and phrases have crept into common … Continue reading The Etymology Of Crime – Tyburn.

On Crime And Conversation – Criminal Slang In Everyday Use.


Crime, it’s a part of human existence. It’s in our culture, our art, our literature, our entertainment. For some of us it’s in our blood. It’s also crossed over into our language. Seemingly normal everyday phrases, the kind most people use without even thinking about their origin, can often have the darkest, most disturbing meanings. … Continue reading On Crime And Conversation – Criminal Slang In Everyday Use.

Irene Schroeder – Pennsylvania ‘Trigger Woman.’


 We're back in Pennsylvania for our latest criminal curiosity. Irene Schroeder, AKA 'Triiger Woman', 'The Blonde Bandit', 'Tiger Woman' and 'Iron Irene', was the first woman to be electrocuted in Pennsylvania. Executioner Robert Elliott said that, of all the 387 convicts he executed, that she was the most composed and fearless inmate he ever executed.She … Continue reading Irene Schroeder – Pennsylvania ‘Trigger Woman.’